Opt Out of Junk Mail

For no reason today I thought to Google “opt out of junk mail”, which lead me to an FTC page which describes how you can do just that. It takes about ninety seconds.

  1. Go to www.optoutprescreen.com to opt out of all credit card offers for five years.
  2. Pay $2 at www.DMAchoice.org and you can opt out of seemingly all other junk mail for ten years.

We’ll see how it works, but I assume if it’s linked to from the FTC website it’s pretty legit.

American Democracy Is Doomed

American democracy is doomed – Vox:

To understand the looming crisis in American politics, it’s useful to think about Germany, Japan, Italy, and Austria. These are countries that were defeated by American military forces during the Second World War and given constitutions written by local leaders operating in close collaboration with occupation authorities. It’s striking that even though the US Constitution is treated as a sacred text in America’s political culture, we did not push any of these countries to adopt our basic framework of government.

This wasn’t an oversight.

I recommend reading this entire article. It was written pre-Trump, and it’s hard to look at now and think that anything in the last two years hasn’t made this seem more right than when it was published.

Micro.blog Now Available for Everyone

As of today, anyone can sign up for Manton Reece’s fabulous Micro.blog with a code or having been a Kickstarter backer. I’ve been using the service for the last several months, and it’s become a great community. I love how it’s able to pull in content from different sources via RSS and present it all in one timeline. If you want to follow me there, I’m @collin.

If Object-Oriented Programming Were Announced Today

Graham Lee has a post titled If Object-Oriented Programming were announced today:

Here’s an idea: the current backlash against OOP is actually because people aren’t doing OOP, they’re doing whatever they were doing before OOP. But they’re calling it OOP, because the people who were promoting OOP wanted them to believe that they were already doing OOP.

Basically, Graham argues that a lot of the “newer” paradigms are just OOP by a different name, and that none of us were really doing pure OOP to begin with. You should also check out his talk at UlKonf 2015Object Oriented Programming in Objective-C — where he talks about a lot of the same things in greater detail.

The Run Loop Episode 2 with Manton Reece

This week on The Run Loop I was lucky enough to be joined by Manton Reece, creator of Micro.blog and long time Mac and iOS developer. We talk about working on independent projects, building communities, creating a social network that’s resistant to harassment, tabs vs spaces, and more! Please check out the show on it’s website and if you haven’t subscribed in your podcast player of choice, please do.

Also, if you’re enjoying The Run Loop, please tell a friend, review the show on iTunes, and recommend it in Overcast.

Help Manton Hit His Indie Microblogging Stretch Goal

Manton Reece has four days to go on his “Indie Microblogging” Kickstarter, and he still needs our help. He’s trying to create an ad-free open platform for microblogging where people own their own data and can take it where they please. Right now he’s at $68,620 of his original $10,000 goal — which is fantastic. Manton has built safety into the platform with a feature he calls “Safe Replies” to fight abuse, but if he reaches his stretch goal of $80,000 he can hire community manager to make the service even better:

If the Kickstarter reaches $80,000, I will use some of the money to make my very first part-time hire for Micro.blog: a community manager. The community manager will help set the tone for the service, work on documentation and best practices, and be responsible for curation when Safe Replies fails to automatically catch emerging problems.

I’m going to up the amount that I’m in for. If you haven’t already pledged to help — and you can — you should.

The CocoaPods App

Managing third party code on iOS has always been a pain. In the past 9 years or so I’ve done everything from dragging source directly into projects, to Git submodules, to CocoaPods, to Carthage, to Git submodules again. Right now I’m using CocoaPods.

I’ve had three problems with CocoaPods from the beginning:

  1. It messes with my Xcode project files.
  2. It stops working for me all the time.
  3. I don’t want to mess around with Ruby gems.

While the first issue seems pretty much intractable, the CocoaPods app seems to (potentially) fix the second two by bundling its own Ruby environment in the app. Because it’s from the people who make CocoaPods, I assume it’ll keep updated to match the command line tool.

The app itself is pretty barebones. I’d love to see a future version let me see what updates are available for my pods from within the app and abstract away me having to edit the podfile by hand. Either way, I’m going to give it a shot. You can check it out on the CocoaPods website.

Brent Harping on Swift Limitations

Brent is harping on limitations you hit when trying to use protocol oriented programming in Swift:

But these days we’re smarter: we use protocols. There’s no reason Folder and File should descend from the same class — they’re almost entirely different, and inheritance is a pain to deal with, so we use protocols instead.

And we’re happy. It works great.

Until you realize that, in Swift, you can’t do this.

I hit something like this yesterday. So no, it’s not just him.