The Growing iOS SDK

David Smith writes about how much the iOS SDK has grown over time. One thing that was interesting is that more “SDK elements” were added in iOS 8 than iPhone OS 2 (which is crazy).

The last paragraph echoes something I’ve felt for a while:

There was a time when I felt like I knew my way around pretty much every non-game SDK available on iOS. Now I often find myself stumbling across frameworks that are completely foreign to me, which is both kind of exciting but also extremely daunting.

I suppose that’s normal. I can’t tell you how often I find out about a “new” API only to realize it’s been around since iOS 5.

NetNewsWire 4

The best is back! The folks at Black Pixel have shipped NetNewsWire 4 for Mac and iOS. I’ve already bought it from the App Store and it looks great.

Congratulations to all of my friends at Black Pixel for getting this out the door. It’s been a long road, and I’m glad to see their work paying off.

Acorn 5

It’s a couple of days back now, but Flying Meat has released a new version of their fantastic image editor: Acorn. I’ve used Acorn for my work and personal projects since version 1.0 in 2008, and it’s incredible to see how far it’s come while still keeping the simplicity that made it so appealing in that first version.

Gus is a friend — so don’t tell him I said this — but to me he’s always been the epitome of the one person indie who’s both a world class developer and also a fantastic designer. Check it out.

Answers Events by Crashlytics

I’ve used Crashlytics for beta testing my new app, including their lightweight analytics-thing Answers. It’s cool in that it shows you the most relevant data, but I was never going to be able to sell it as a replacement for Flurry or Google Analytics (which I loathe). Today they announced Answers can do event tracking, and on top of that it looks fabulous. The web UI makes it really easy to see and add the most common kinds of things I’d actually want to track, and the iOS SDK looks like it was made by people who have written Cocoa before.

Hopefully Twitter can keep from fucking this up.

Daniel Jalkut on Apple News

Apple News And The Open Web | Bitsplitting.org:

I’m optimistic that Apple’s News app will be a strike against centralized services such as Medium, Twitter, and Facebook. A strike against signing over content to a 3rd party mediator for the sake of a greater chance at connecting to an audience. Apple may not be the world’s best technology company when it comes to either storing data or building a social network around it, but they are damned good at building a captive audience of delighted users who trust the company to provide access to a variety of 3rd party content.

Calling iMessage an impressive social network is a bit of a stretch considering my messages still sync across devices in seemingly any order. I don’t know if the News app is going to pull anyone who’s dedicated to RSS away from it, but it might be great for those who aren’t.

The Cheapest Generation

Link: The Cheapest Generation

Article in The Atlantic about how millennials just aren’t as interested in buying houses and cars as our parents:

The largest generation in American history might never spend as lavishly as its parents did—nor on the same things. Since the end of World War II, new cars and suburban houses have powered the world’s largest economy and propelled our most impressive recoveries. Millennials may have lost interest in both.

I don’t know if I’m different than other people my age — this article says I’m not — but debt of any kind has always scared the crap out of me. It’s difficult for me to paint buying a new car or a house in any other terms than a lot of money I’m going to owe someone else. I just can’t get more excited about either of those things than I am scared of the debt they represent.